Coffee Pod #1: Lessons from 7x world champion - Layne Beachley

Episode #1: Layne Beachley  

Holly Ransom:   

Hi, I'm Holly Ransom and welcome to Coffee Pods, a podcast devoted to fueling your difference. Here at Coffee Pods, we have a simple hypothesis that in the mere amount of time it takes to share a cup of coffee with someone, we can tap in to a lifetime of experience. And that's exactly what we aim to do here at Coffee Pods. To give access to some incredible individuals who've marched to the beat of their own drum and who are willing to share their advice, their highs, their lows, their insights in order to help give [00:00:30] each and everyone of us the toolkit and the inspiration to fuel the difference that we're trying to make in our own lives, communities and organizations.  

Layne Beachley:  

The prerequisite to establishing a vision needs to be how you want to feel more so than what it is you were to achieve. I now have realized [00:01:00] upon reflection that by achieving that success, what I really wanted to feel was deserving of love.  

Holly Ransom:                 

I'm absolutely pumped for this Coffee Pods with Layne Beachley, the most successful female surfer in history and the only surfer male or female to claim six consecutive world titles. She won a total of seven over the course of her career. Now she has got every sporting accolade under the sun. She is a surfing hall of fame inductee, a Sports Australia hall of fame inductee, a world master's champion and in 2015 [00:01:30] in recognition of both her service to sport and her contribution to the community, she became an Order of Australia recipient. 

This is a really raw insightful, honest conversation that I think you'll find really inspiring. Here is Layne. Layne the legend Beachley, I'm stoked to be getting to do a Coffee Pod with you, thank you so much for joining us. 

Layne Beachley:               

You're so welcome Holly. 

Holly Ransom:               

 Listen, I've read ... I mean I had the privilege of knowing you for a couple of years but I've been reading all about you and I've loved the fact that I've got to learn lots of little tidbits that I didn't even know about your journey and [00:02:00] everything you've done thus far. And I was reading a bit about sort of your first surf done at age four at Manley and the first days of you dipping your toes into the water. 

Was it from that moment that you knew you were going to be a surfer or was there a significant moment later in childhood that set you on the path? What happened? 

Layne Beachley:              

There was no definitive moment in my life where I knew I was gonna be a surfer. I just fell in love with surfing. And you know, the classic cliché is your passions find you. [00:02:30] And definitely, surfing found me. Having the distinct advantage of growing up at Manley beach and having my dad as a surfer, my older brother as a surfer and any younger who grows up with an older brother that they do something, you wanna be able to do it better which I can confidently say I do. It was just part of my childhood that became part of my adulthood that now it becomes a very important, an integral part of my life. So I'm very grateful that my dad introduced me to surfing to [00:03:00] such a young age when I'm fearless. I mean, all kids are fearless at that age, we're more curious than fearful and I was very grateful that I grow up in such a supportive household that encouraged me to go and be a tomboy. 

Holly Ransom:                 

So what age did it become competitive for you? How early was it that you were actually starting to be on the circuit, so to speak? 

Layne Beachley:             

I started competing when I was 14 and that was actually ... I didn't actually graduate from my foamie onto a fiber glass surfboard until I was 13. 

Holly Ransom:                

Really? 

Layne Beachley:

[00:03:30] Yeah. And even now when I reflect back on that time, I realize how many limitations and rules and stipulations I placed around what I was gonna do and when I was gonna do it by. And so I think I decided that you know, 16 was a mature age and that's when I was gonna progress onto a fiber glass surfboard but I was encouraged to do that a little sooner. 

So by the time I was 13, one of the ... 'cause I went to an all girls' high school, an all girls' public school high school. One of the girls that in the year above [00:04:00] me was a surfer and her and I became like-minded mates so we could talk about surfing and I actually bought one of her boards. 

So my first secondhand fiber glass surfboard was from a girl who ultimately became a mentor. She became my surfing buddy. 

Holly Ransom:                 

I'm interesting. 'Cause now female professional surfing is such a norm, it's hard to imagine that it ever wasn't at the competitive level and the equity that it now is. What was it like being a girl on tour, back when you were 14? 

Layne Beachley:              

So yes, as I was saying, I started competing when I was 14. I actually came dead last [00:04:30] in the first few events I competed in but most fortunately, they were either a charity event or a board runners club event. I actually didn't start competing int he big tour events until I was 15. And once again, I came dead last when I did that too. 

I remember just looking around going, "Where are the women?" Because I felt like we've lost the benefit of gender. They were so hungry and desperate to earn that recognition and respect from their male counterparts that they acted like men, dressed like men, tried to surf like men, we just lost the benefit of gender and I'm thinking, "I thought there was meant to be a women's' [00:05:00] tour," and beautiful women on tour but they just weren't embracing their femininity. So at first, I felt like the tour had an identity crisis, quite honestly, I didn't really know what it was standing for or what it was representing. 

And it wasn't until the early 90s when Lisa Anderson really broke that mould. You know, she embraced her femininity and her beauty and her grace and her flow and her style and she went out and surfed the waves like a girl. And I think it was the first time they started printing shirts with "Surf like a girl," or "I surf like a girl," because Lisa [00:05:30] clearly demonstrated what that can look like and feel like.  

I was walking through the airport today on my way, I was traveling interstate and a guy come up to me, an employee from the company I was flying with and basically said, "You know, everything you've done for women's' surfing, I'm just so grateful to you. You know, you've done such an amazing job and you've really changed the landscape, women in surfing."  

But then I also respect what my predecessors went through that enabled me to then go on and change the landscape of women surfing. And that's all came back down to my own vision of what I wanted women surfing to be, to emulate women's' tennis. 

Holly Ransom:

Nice. [00:06:00] Tell me how early did that goal kick in that I'm gonna be a world champion? Is there a definitive moment you can remember where that light bulb and that focus switched on with that degree of specificity? 

Layne Beachley:

Yes. And that was when I was eight years old. It all goes back to being told I was adopted. My dad sat me down and told me I was adopted and we all know, perception starts in the brain, it doesn't start with the ears or the eyes. And so the way that we see things or hear things can be completely manufactured and to appear different than in our brains. 

So when my dad said, "We love you [00:06:30] and we're so glad that we have you and that you're my little girl," all I've heard was, "You've been rejected, you've been abandoned and you're undeserving of love." That knowledge and that experience is what actually sparked that desire to become the best in the world because when I was sitting in the couch, I feel like I was being swallowed by the couch. I felt so worthless, I thought, "What am I gonna do about this? I can't stay in this state, it's just too uncomfortable. So what am I gonna do? I know, if I become a world champion, everyone will love me." And that's what drove me to become this [00:07:00] groundbreaking world champion because my expectation of life or how I had defined success was all based on a feeling, not so much a definition of achievement. 

I never chose to feel like I was enough until I had become what I deemed to be successful which wasn't a one time's world champion, it was a six times consecutive world champion which meant I was the best of the best.  

Now it wasn't until I was 15 that I became a world champion surfer and that's when I clearly put the stake in the sand. [00:07:30] I won my first regional scholastic event and went on to win the state titles, I had a horrible time at the national titles, joined the pro tour fresh out of high school and then it took me eight years to win my first world title. 

Holly Ransom:

Wow, it's an incredible journey. To have that level of conviction in yourself at such a young age, again, in the face of really traumatic news, though. There is a pretty incredible drive that sits beneath that, really, in you. Like a fire and a determination. 

Layne Beachley:

Absolutely. And yesterday I was asked, "Do you think you would have achieved what you achieved without that drive, especially your first world title?" And it's difficult [00:08:00] to answer because it's how I achieved it. There are different ways to make success. Success is binary, you can be successful and respectful. I felt like I actually cost myself a lot of happiness, a lot of respect, a lot of joy and a lot of great friendship because of my sheer determination and compassion of a tiger shot. 

Holly Ransom:

I read that quote that from you, I love that. Empathy and compassion at the tiger shot. 

Layne Beachley:

I was so hungry and so fierce and so determined and everybody in my way, well everybody along the way were in my way. You know, [00:08:30] I was on a mission and I basically, I just destroyed so many great things because I was so fiercely determined and driven that I now realize that you don't have to succeed through that mindset. And what I do is that I continuously seek evidence of that to prove that I'm wrong. 

Most of the time, we're looking to prove ourselves right but I actually wanna prove myself wrong. I wanna disprove that belief because I know that's a survival mode mechanism and because we're constantly seeking evidence of what we believe, sometimes our beliefs don't serve us and so I know [00:09:00] if I'm in struggle and back into survival mode, it can be easy and graceful and joyful. 

Holly Ransom:

I love that for a couple of reasons. How did you have the self awareness at that point to go, "Hold on, this formula doesn't work anymore. I delivered six world titles." A lot of people would be super superstitious and say, "Don't mess with the winning formula, this is working, hold on to it." What was the moment that kind of prompted you to go, "Actually, I need to go about this differently." 

Layne Beachley:

It was after I won my sixth world title. I started to listen to the symptoms of my body, I started to realize that I was breaking down, mentally, physically, emotionally [00:09:30] and spiritually. I was running on empty. I was fueled by adrenaline and there was nothing to fill the tank anymore and so I had to start honoring my body 'cause I was asking so much of it and yet it kept breaking down. Learning to do things differently. 

Yes, I chose to ignore that again and I went off and had to compete for my seventh world title and half way through the year, I tore my meniscus and my medial ligament in my right knee and then everything else started to get a little bit creaky and then halfway through 2005 [00:10:00] I was doing a photo shoot and went and put my board down at seven o'clock in the morning, so I had not warmed up and something went snap in my shoulder blades and I went an got an MRI and it showed that I had a very severe herniation, a disc herniation in my neck around the C5 C6 area that had gradually worn onto my spinal cord and was now severing 80% of it. 

Holly Ransom:

Wow. 

Layne Beachley:

Yeah, so I was given two options. Either retire or get surgery and both of them seemed pretty logical at the time but neither of them appealed to me. 

Holly Ransom:

[00:10:30] Imagine that. 

Layne Beachley:

And you know, I was this close to winning my seventh world title and I decided that I needed to get a third opinion and that doctor suggested that I'm young and fit and strong enough to allow my body to heal itself so you gotta give it time. And I said, "How much have I got?" And he said, "However much time it takes." So you gonna have to learn patience. And that's actually when I started learning the three Ps to success, patience, passion and perseverance and so ... 

Holly Ransom:

I imagine the first of those came harder than the other two for you. 

Layne Beachley:

[00:11:00] Yes, you know me well. It brought me the value of honing my attention and intention and retention into healing. I basically dedicated myself to healing my body and allowed myself to take as long as it was possibly gonna take. So ideally, I didn't want it to take more than six months but it actually took a little bit longer because my intention was to come back and compete again. There was no need to prove anything any longer. I had pretty much proven enough. [00:11:30] You know, to be the most successful surfer in history. 

Holly Ransom:

You have a seriously good pool room.  

Layne Beachley:

It is. And it doesn't have anyone else's memorabilia but ours. [inaudible 00:11:39] 

Holly Ransom:

Not yet. So if I'm right, you won your third world title with a broken back. You've battled chronic fatigue twice, you mentioned already that you've competed with a torn meniscus, that you [inaudible 00:11:52] to do a herniated disc and I also know and I don't wanna make light of this by any stretch that you've gone through [00:12:00] a really challenging period of depression and even suicidal thoughts. What did you do to get through that? What coping skills and habits and techniques did you rely on to be able to cope? 

Layne Beachley:

I have to say my model for success is what's enabled me to get through all those things. So first is having that clear vision of what it is that I want to achieve. Now, today, my vision is set in a very different way. Back then, as an athlete, my vision was to become [00:12:30] the best of the best. And now I realize, the prerequisite to establishing a vision needs to be how you want to feel more so than what it is you were to achieve. 

Holly Ransom:

I like that. 

Layne Beachley:

Because I now realize upon reflection that by achieving that success, what I really wanted to feel was deserving of love. And the limitation I had placed on it was that the only way I was gonna be deserving of love was when I became the most successful surfer in history. 

Holly Ransom:

Setting yourself a reasonably high bar. 

Layne Beachley:

[00:13:00] It's a big bar, yes. So having a really clearly articulated vision helped me overcome a lot of those challenges because my desire to succeed, my desire to grow, my desire to bounce back and learn is much more dominant in my life than my fear of failure and my willingness to stay stark. So my desire to grow and improve and learn is what propels me forward. 

So that's the main thing, it's like clarity and vision. The second piece to [00:13:30] the puzzle is having that dream team of mentors, guidance, experts. You know, people that you surround yourself with that elevate you, nudge you, develop you, challenge you, very honest with you. So if I didn't have those people that I had that respect and trust and regard for, then I would never would have been courageous enough to put my hand up and ask for help. 

When I had chronic fatigue the second time, you didn't think, well, I learned from the first time, but obviously [inaudible 00:13:56] again, that was probably one of the deepest darkest times in my life 'cause that's when I did have depression [00:14:00] and I was suicidal and it was very disconcerting to wake up thinking of different ways to kill myself [inaudible 00:14:06] lover of life and so sprightly. 

It was a really dark period and I couldn't navigate my own life through it. So I put my hand up and asked for help from a friend who I knew had been through a circumstance or a situation quite similar and her response was, "What took you so long?" 

Holly Ransom:

Oh wow. 

Layne Beachley:

So when the student's ready, the teacher will appear and- 

Holly Ransom:

I love that one. 

Layne Beachley:

I wasn't ready. I wasn't ready to own my ship, I [00:14:30] wasn't ready to own my misery, I wasn't really ready to recognize that I was in a really bad state and I wasn't willing to do anything about it. So basically, I was just stuck in a life of hope. I was hoping things would change, I was hoping things would get better, I was hoping somebody might recognize that I need help and so as long as you stay stuck in a life of hope, you're deferring dissatisfaction and when you defer dissatisfaction, you're deferring action. 

So that's the final piece of the puzzle is the risk that you've gotta take. The action always seems like risk because you haven't taken it before [00:15:00] or it's gonna make you feel uncomfortable and you beautifully say, you gotta expand your comfort zone. 

Holly Ransom:

How did you cope with the pressure, the expectation, people expecting you to be the absolute world's best? 

Layne Beachley:

Well, initially I coped with it very poorly. But I'd also realized that no one can place more expectation on your shoulders than you. Well, I look back at that period, I was always saying, you know, the world expects me to achieve this. But no one expects you to achieve. But everyone just wants to see you happy, everyone just wants to see you fulfill your potential. And [00:15:30] everyone wants to see you be satisfied in life and whatever definition that is for you, then go after it and I'm gonna support you to do it. I'm gonna challenge you a little bit but you don't have to be a world beater to be successful. 

The first few years, I cracked under my own pressure. I used to crumble under pressure. I trash talked my competitors and then go out and lose to them and then wonder why I was so disappointed. 

Holly Ransom:

Vicious cycle? I think I've seen you say somewhere that you spent eight years failing before you finally won. 

Layne Beachley:

I did, I spent eight years failing to learn how to win. And it wasn't until I won [00:16:00] my first world title that I realized, "Yes, I had a fear of success and yes, I'm placing immense amounts, an unrealistic amount of expectation on my own shoulders." I started dating a guy called Ken Bradshaw who also wanted me to win as much for me as it was for him. And so I was so addicted to his validation that whenever I lost, I would burst into tears because I felt I had let him down. 

So my competitors thought I was a sore loser but they didn't realize what was going on in my head, that I was deeply distressed because Ken [00:16:30] was so invested in me that I didn't want to let him down. So I actually started winning my world titles for him versus winning them for me. And you know, he was everything to me. You don't wanna disappoint. 

Holly Ransom:

So talk to me about life post surfing. As you mentioned, you're now a motivational speaker, one of the country's best. You run your own foundation, Layne Beachley Aim for the stars foundation. You're president and chair woman of Surfing Australia which very excitingly is gonna become an Olympic sport in Tokyo. How easy did you find the transition to life post surfing? Was it easy [00:17:00] to find your feet on land? 

Layne Beachley:

Well, the first thing I did is I found my feet barefoot in the kitchen because all I wanted to do was bake. 

Holly Ransom:

I should add actually, you're a really awesome baker. Particularly banana bread. 

Layne Beachley:

And found that that really didn't light my fire, you know. Didn't really replace the euphoric experience of standing on a podium, holding a world title trophy above my head, being sprayed with champagne. And still, like I said, it took me three or four months to navigate my way around it. I mean, I went to this event. John Singleton invited me to a blue ton brewery [00:17:30] launch and I thought my dad would love that so I'll take my dad and of course Kirk would love that, what rockstar doesn't drink beer? So I took my dad and Kirk off to this launch and afterwards, John was asking me, "What are you up to in life?" "Yeah, I don't know, I've kind of lost my mojo, I've lost my passion, I don't know what I'm passionate about." 

And he goes, "Well, I'm sorry, you have no passion in your life." 

Holly Ransom:Oh, that hurt. 

Layne Beachley:Oh, that hurts. 'Cause at the time when I retired, I had my own clothing brand, I was staging the richest surfing event in the world, I had my own charity and I was baking. I mean, there was [00:18:00] so much going on but none of it excited it. None of it was really what I was really into. And one by one, bit by bit, I had to sever the cord, you know, cut the umbilical cord and let it go. 

You know, the clothing brand was the first one, then the surf event after seven years, I decided to let that go, I had achieved everything that I wanted it to achieve. So I'd obviously held on to the foundation but the motivational speaking and the workshops I deliver is what lights me up. 

And that's been a 10 year evolution. You know, I think about the [00:18:30] first motivational speech I ever gave, I actually received a formal written complaint. 

Holly Ransom:No, I didn't know that. 

Layne Beachley:Yeah, that's how great I was when I started speaking. So you know, all those motivational quotes about "Don't wait till the moment's perfect, just get out there and do it," I'm really glad I've continued to just get out there and do it because continue the strive for perfection [inaudible 00:18:52] never do anything. And I think about the speech that I give now versus the speeches that I gave 10 years ago and they're totally different. They're two different worlds. But I have learned [00:19:00] from every single one of them. 'Cause I'm reading the audience and think, "Nah, this isn't working, I need to drop that content and bring in something new." 

So we're always evolving, we're always learning, we're always absorbing. I learn a lot from watching you and speaking with you and my other mentors as well. So I'm always tapping into the knowledge and experience of other people but never discrediting or discounting my own and how important and valuable my knowledge is. 

Holly Ransom:Yeah, absolutely. 

Layne Beachley:But the thing is, sometimes we don't value our knowledge and we just regurgitate other people's wisdom. 

Holly Ransom:                 I think you're right. [00:19:30] You know, we so often feel trapped by expectation and pressure and what people presume we should do. 

Layne Beachley:               

That's it. And the thing is that when I retired I knew that life was gonna be different and one of the best pieces of advice I received was from a former executive at Big Silver who said, "Schedule your wake around the surf forecast." 

Holly Ransom:               

Which you [remotely 00:19:48] do. 

Layne Beachley:             

Which is what I do, yes. So 'cause I've canceled this thing twice now to gosurfing. 

Holly Ransom:                

Hey, I'm aware of the lax structure and format, I was prepared for that. 

Layne Beachley:             

My happy place is the ocean [00:20:00] and for me to inspire and empower people in an authentic way, I have to inspire and empower myself and the one place that I can do that is nature. 

Holly Ransom:                 

So for those who are listening who are eager to connect with you, to get more involved in what you're doing or get more information, what's the best way for them to reach out and connect? 

Layne Beachley:               

So the best thing is to just go to my website, laynebeachley.com and subscribe to my newsletter and you can always contact me directly through that. And then if you wanna get involved with Aim for the Stars, they can jump on the aimforthestars.com.au 'cause we're all about empowering young [00:20:30] women to become the future leaders of this world. We're all about supporting girls on the way up, not waiting till they get there before we start to believe in them. Cultivate, encourage and fostering self belief in young girls and women to achieve their dreams. 

Holly Ransom:               

 I should make mention of the fact here that the foundation's whole reason for being has a very personal connection to your own story and experience. Tell us a little bit about why this foundation matters so much to you. 

Layne Beachley:               

The core premise behind Aim for the Stars was born out of reflection. I was number two in the world, working 60 hours a week in four different jobs, [00:21:00] earning $8,000 a year. It was all very hard. I was ready to quit. Actually, I almost did several times. 

                                           

And after one of the night shifts, I used to work at one of the most celebrious locations in Manley called the Old Manley Boatshed, oh my God, I'm still embarrassed to say I worked there. I needed employment that was either at night so I could surf during the day or that was flexible enough to maybe go off and do events and then come back. So fortunately, they had a really high rotation of staff and I was just able to slip right back in. They had three different tiers of bar and restaurant [00:21:30] and music so I was able to hover around in those three bars. 

                                           

But fortunately, one of my employers saw how hard I was working and he basically sat me down after work at three o'clock in the morning and said, "I see how hard you're working, I hear how much you want this and I believe in you. And here is $3,000, here is your next [inaudible 00:21:50] ticket." 

Holly Ransom:                 

Wow. 

Layne Beachley:               

Right, so it was such a [inaudible 00:21:53] moment to make me realize, you know, I was ready to quit last week and now you've reinvigorated my confidence just [00:22:00] by saying that I see you, I hear you, I believe in you, here's some cash. It was more the words than the cash but of course the cash went a long way at that point because now I could actually afford to sleep in accommodation in Hawaii in the next last year of events as opposed to sleeping in my board bag in contest areas which is what I used to do. 

Holly Ransom:                 

I had no idea of that. 

Layne Beachley:              

Yeah, you'd be surprised at how we made ends meet but we did everything that we possibly could. 'Cause we were earning ... I would have to pay for an entry fee to go to an event so the [00:22:30] Old Manley Boatshed started paying for my entry fees and then, there was no guarantee I'd earn prize money until I'd made it through the main rounds. And then I'd get through those rounds and I'd come up against the number one seat in the world, the world champion, and have to beat her to then earn $1,000. 

Holly Ransom:                 

Wow. 

Layne Beachley:              

And then if I won the event, I think I may have walked away with about $6,000 if I was lucky. So there wasn't enormous amount of money in it and I know my event has actually changed how the world tour pays. 

Holly Ransom:                 

Which is an incredible credit to you. 

Layne Beachley:              

Thank you. And I'm [00:23:00] really proud of that legacy. 'Cause I wanted to leave the sport in a better place than I found it which wasn't ... it wasn't in a great place when I found it, quite honestly. But the reason that Aim for the Stars started was that I realized that if I granted a girl $3,000 and told her I believed in her, it'd prevent her from quitting. I've always had a strong work ethics, I always knew that if surfing didn't work out for me, I'd go back to working in a bar or a restaurant or I don't know, I'd go back to school. I don't know, there was other opportunities but I didn't hang my hook on them and have a plan B, I just knew that in the event that after [00:23:30] I committed myself wholly to this, if it didn't work out, I was willing to accept that and then go on and do something different. 

 But I wasn't willing to allow circumstances such as lack of financial support to prevent me from achieving my dreams. And there was a couple of times when I almost did but that's when someone saw it in me and said, "Here you go, kid, here's three grand, here's your next [inaudible 00:23:53] ticket, take it." Or, "Here you go, I believe in you, you've got what it takes." 

Holly Ransom:                 

I love that. 

Layne Beachley:              So, get out of your own way and get on with it. 

Holly Ransom:                 

And [00:24:00] I should just say, it's incredible to see the way that you've paid that forward. The ripple effect this foundation has created year in, year out, have won gold medals because of the foundation's support, the mentoring's changed their life, the ability to get an idea off the ground. It's an absolute credit to you what you've built with aim for the stars, it's remarkable. 

Layne Beachley:               You just don't know how long your words are gonna sit with somebody. So now I wanna change that and make sure that the words that I'm sharing with the world are positive and reinforcing and uplifting. 

Holly Ransom:                 

Hey, I'm so appreciative of your time today. Thank you so [00:24:30] much for joining us. For those who are seeking to be the absolute best in whatever their field of chosen endeavor is, what's the best bit of advice that you give them for how to do that? 

Layne Beachley:              Be clear on how you wanna feel. 

Holly Ransom:                 Okay. I like that. 

Layne Beachley:              

You know, our lives are so guided, we're almost dictated by society about what we're meant to do and there's very little positive reinforcement in society, be more, do more. I don't know, you're never enough [00:25:00] no matter what you do. The best piece of advice I can anybody is choose to be enough in who you are and then start to wrestle with that and challenge yourself. And ask yourself, how do you wanna feel? Like my vision, for myself today and every day is to wake up excited about the day ahead. 

Holly Ransom:                

Nice. 

Layne Beachley:              

Now I know that there's gonna be costs associated with that, I'm not always gonna wake up excited, especially tomorrow when I wake up in Canberra. But I'm excited by the opportunity and the fact that I get to share my knowledge and experiences and wisdom [00:25:30] with audiences. 

Holly Ransom:                 

Final question. What's your call to arms, call to action for the people that are listening to this podcast? 

Layne Beachley:              

Once you've decided how you wanna feel and that can start with even asking yourself ... 'cause a lot of people go ask me, "How do I find my passion, how do I find my purpose?" And you can answer that simply by asking yourself what excites me? Then the call to action is to share that with somebody because we all need accountability partners to achieve in life. 

Holly Ransom:                  

You're an absolute legend, Layne Beachley, I can't thank you enough for joining [00:26:00] us on Coffee Pods and making the time. I feel really grateful to be able to call you a friend and mentor and an honesty [inaudible 00:26:06] and I know that you're an inspiration, not just to me but to so many people out there.                   

And I've got such admiration for the depths, the breadths, the heights of the accolade and the accomplishments you've achieved. But maybe more than anything, it's the fact that you're absolutely authenticity personified. So honest and real, I can't thank you enough for sharing so generously today. 

[00:26:30] Thanks for listening. I hope you feel inspired and have some practical ideas for how you can go and fuel the difference you wanna see in your life, organization, or community. If that's a yes, please take a moment to send us feedback, shoot me a tweet at Holly Ransom, leave a review for this Coffee Pod or head to www. [00:27:00] coffeepodwithholly.com and sending your questions and suggestions for future Coffee Pods. But for now until our next coffee break, I've been Holly Ransom, thanks for fueling your difference with me.